Every now and then I get very confused by questions or answers which have specific country references in them. For instance, references to particular grades or years at school. Also, some healthcare, sports, and geographical references are difficult for me to translate.

Obviously I can usually find out more by googling, but I'm sure I'm not the only one who doesn't want to have to google just to find out how old children in K-3 would be.

So, could I just suggest that people try to include such details in their postings?

It isn't hard for me, for example, to type "Key stage 2", and assume that everyone knows what I'm talking about. Because you're all parents aren't you? So surely you know that Key Stage 2 refers to the schooling children receive between the ages of 7 and 11. It might be better if I were to type "Key Stage 2 (aged 7-11)" though, and not that much more typing for me.

I know we Brits are a minority, but there are a surprising number of non-US citizens on here.

asked 20 Nov '09, 13:04

Meg%20Stephenson's gravatar image

Meg Stephenson
5.4k2719
accept rate: 7%

+1 :) because your answer made me smile! I have learnt to use the terms, Diaper instead of Nappy, Onesie instead of Bodysuit, and Pacifier instead of Dummy :) Its fun.

(20 Nov '09, 13:37) Emi
1

I'm going to follow up with you on this, but have to close.

(20 Nov '09, 13:43) Scott ♦♦

I was posting this as an answer before it got closed. I think it is a good idea to use standard terms, for example I tend to quote measurements in metric and use imperial in parentheses (though for some reason I do it the other way round sometimes).

In about 400 more reputation, you will be able to modify other user's posts. There are already 9 users that can already do so (7 over 200 rep and 2 administrators), so if the consensus is that country specific terms should be explained, the community has the power to modify posts accordingly

(20 Nov '09, 13:45) Rich Seller
3

Key stage 2?? What? What if I say Bebé de nivel medio a alto, con ligera tendencia al nivel alto?

(20 Nov '09, 14:06) JJJ

For things like age in school, then yes, people should use an age instead of a country specific term. Other terms, no. I will continue to say dummy, I'm not going to translate it into every other language used by anyone that visits this board. Equally well, I will continue to stumble over and have to think about the US terms that crop up here. Onesie!! That I would never have guessed. :)

(20 Nov '09, 18:19) pipthegeek

I think language is different from country specific. If I refer to "The Robins", and assume you know that I'm talking about a small local soccer team, isn't that just annoying?

(20 Nov '09, 18:36) Meg Stephenson

For the record, not everyone understands "Key Stage 2." To me, that's as cultural as K-3 is to you. Metric I can get. Nappy, bodysuit, etc, I can figure out (lots of Brit writers in college). But a lot of development lingo, not so much. So just because you think something is a standard term, doesn't mean everyone will understand it.

(20 Nov '09, 23:33) mkcoehoorn

This is a great discussion. I hope you guys will move it over to the discussion forums on the Facebook fan page. Please see this answer to Meg's follow up question: http://moms4mom.com/questions/2742/where-can-i-ask-questions-about-the-site-and-its-structure/2749#2749

(21 Nov '09, 04:44) Scott ♦♦

Of course, this 'question' presupposes that people even KNOW when they're being culture specific. I suspect in many cases, they don't.

(07 Jan '10, 11:09) Benjol

http://moms4mom.com/questions/3620/english-to-english-translation/3625

(08 Jan '10, 10:33) Benjol
showing 5 of 10 show 5 more comments

I like where you're going with this, but just be prepared: posts like this tend to get closed as "not a real question."

link

answered 20 Nov '09, 13:26

Dinah's gravatar image

Dinah
3.7k21440
accept rate: 15%

+1 because you have such common sensical answers :)

(20 Nov '09, 13:30) Emi

@Emi: thanks :) I try

(20 Nov '09, 13:31) Dinah
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Asked: 20 Nov '09, 13:04

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Last updated: 20 Nov '09, 13:26