I have just started weaning my baby he is nearly 6 1/2 months and have noticed his reflux has become more severe, has this happened to anyone else, if so is there certain foods that aggrevate more than others?

asked 20 Jan '10, 18:46

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Phil Seller
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Just to clarify, when you say "weaning" do you mean reducing breastfeeding or do you mean continuing to breastfeed along with the introduction of foods? (Some people use only use "weaning" to mean stopping breastfeeding.)

(21 Jan '10, 16:36) cat_g

he still has 3 milk feeds a day, and two food feeds, he is also teething so am wondering if the increased saliva is also having an impact.

(22 Jan '10, 07:02) Phil Seller

I don't have a baby with reflux, but I have had reflux myself for almost 15 years. It may not be the same for infants, but I imagine there are some similarities for food sensitivities. Here are some common foods to avoid when you have acid reflux:

  • citrus fruits and juices
  • tomatos
  • onions
  • cucumbers
  • bell peppers
  • high fat foods and deep fried foods (although I imagine you aren't feeding your 6.5 month old deep fried foods!)

For myself, I find that caffeine can aggravate my reflux as well. So, if you are still nursing perhaps avoid caffeine altogether while your baby's reflux has flared up since some caffeine does end up in breast milk. Foods with caffeine include:

  • coffee
  • tea
  • chocolate
  • coke
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answered 21 Jan '10, 16:48

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cat_g
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edited 22 Jan '10, 04:01

Our first had reflux problems since about 6 weeks which severely affected his appetite. We didn't notice much difference with particular foods, except perhaps that "weighting" milk/formula with rice or grain cereal helped him keep it down. Baby food stayed down pretty well in general. Feed lots of yogurt (Yo-Baby is the only non-low-fat we can find) and that should help keep the stomach replenished with digestive enzymes. You can also give a probiotic after/with meals. We had to additionally use Prilosec (omeprazole) for our son which worked absolutely wonderfully. We didn't increase the dosage as he got older and he eventually out-grew the need for it and no longer has reflux problems.

Note: The second omeprazole prescription we filled didn't work and we figured out that a sodium bicarbonate suspended solution is best. Sodium bicarbonate is just baking soda so if you want to save money and have a more effective solution, get the pharmacy to fill your prescription as just the omeprazole capsules (same as for adults) and tell you how to mix it at home (E.g.: 20mg omeprazole + Xml water + Xtsp baking soda, it is very easy). This way you can mix only enough for 1-2 weeks at a time so it will always be fresh. We noticed a decrease in effectiveness after it gets over two weeks old; paying the pharmacy to mix it that often is expensive and probably not covered by your insurance.

We also tried Zantac (ranitadine) which didn't work well at all for our child.

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answered 21 Jan '10, 17:06

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colinm
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+1 for yogurt and omeprazole. I find both very helpful.

(21 Jan '10, 18:57) cat_g

yes he loves yogurt, and i will try baby rice, so far he has only had fruit and veg and am wondering if the acid in the fruit makes it worse.

(22 Jan '10, 07:07) Phil Seller
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Asked: 20 Jan '10, 18:46

Seen: 3,841 times

Last updated: 22 Jan '10, 04:01