Our four year old has just been to the Optometrist this morning and he is long sighted and has one lazy eye. He is being prescribed glasses to be worn fulltime.

Does anyone have any tips for preparing him for glasses, getting him to wear them and protecting them from damage?

asked 16 Jul '10, 01:52

K%20D's gravatar image

K D
4.3k11828
accept rate: 13%


We just went through this with our 3.5yr old son a couple of months ago (same diagnosis, same treatment). We did not make a big deal out of it, just told him he would get glasses "just like daddy". He came along to pick out a frame, in typical 3 yr old fashion, once we tried on a few, he refused to try any more and announced that they all pinched... so we went with the ones he liked the first time he tried them on. Of course when we picked them up he insisted he did not like the brown ones and that he wanted the blue ones ($30 more) instead. The end result: suck it up, kid. You get what you get.

Make sure they fit well. If they pinch, hurt, or are too loose, they will not stay on and the kid will take them off.

Keep them clean - whenever we notice our son fidgeting with his glasses, it's usually because they are smudged and he can't see properly (no wonder, as he is often touching the lenses with his grubby preschooler hands...)

Teach him to take care of them (and buying the super-flexible frames with polycarbonate + anti-scratch coating doesn't hurt)

If you can afford it (we didn't think about it) try and get transition lenses that darken in the sun - the biggest pain we have with his glasses is that he can't wear sunglasses anymore, so he often complains he has sun in his eyes when we are driving, etc.

Kids are remarkably flexible and accommodating - if you just present the glasses as matter-of-fact, they should be just fine with them.

link

answered 16 Jul '10, 12:28

Melanie's gravatar image

Melanie
1.5k311
accept rate: 17%

2

+1 for super-flexible frames. I was older when I got my glasses but still managed to put them through a significant amount of abuse.

(16 Jul '10, 19:06) Kiesa ♦

We were worried about this with our (then) 2 year old (she had a lazy eye and needed glasses).

The first thing is to let the child pick the glasses. Make sure it is a pair that he really loves.

The second thing is make sure that you get someone who really knows what they are doing to fit them to your child. I good fit is key. If they bug/annoy the nose or ears then your child is going to be more likely to take them off (and leave them who knows where!)

In the end we were surprised at how easy it was. We rarely had to fight my daughter to wear them because all of a sudden she could see better!

It has gotten harder as her vision has improved (after an operation). But now she is in the habit and rarely leaves them behind.

One thing to note, Polycarbonate lenses are better for children as the don't break as easy (I think they are required for children too, but I am not sure.) Cost-co offers a good deal on those lenses. (for children only) They also work well with you when the prescription changes an even, sometimes (at least at mine), if they break.

Note: I just noticed that you are in New Zealand. I have no idea if there are Cost-co stores there. Sorry.

link

answered 16 Jul '10, 03:50

Vaccano's gravatar image

Vaccano
34239
accept rate: 33%

+1 really good advice!

(19 Jul '10, 06:16) Emi
Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "Title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "Title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Tags:

×40
×1

Asked: 16 Jul '10, 01:52

Seen: 2,445 times

Last updated: 16 Jul '10, 12:28